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InArkansas Blog

Eat, Play, Shop, Live, Visit, Work. Your daily stop for the latest on all things Arkansas, including your comments. Send blog tips and feedback to InArkansas.com Associate Editor Lauren James here.
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5 Steps To Raising Backyard Butterflies

There’s nothing like watching butterflies flit around the flowers in your garden. Nothing except watching one grow from egg to caterpillar to butterfly in your own home. These days you can purchase a kit to raise butterflies. But it’s also simple enough (not to mention cheaper) to find your own eggs and supplies to do it yourself.

Because of their migratory patterns, monarch butterflies and their eggs and caterpillars can be found in every region of the United States. And they’re hardy enough to withstand novice treatment. The following instructions are for raising monarchs. You’ll find excellent photos of each stage at Monarch-Butterfly.com.

Step One: Select a Container

One of the keys to successful butterfly-raising is creating a proper home. You’ll want a container with good ventilation so the caterpillar droppings (called “frass”) can dry. And select a home with a lid or top where the caterpillar can attach its chrysalis.

Your container doesn’t have to be fancy. We’ve found even an extra-large carryout drink cup with a plastic lid works well. The straw hole allows for circulation and the clear sides make it easy to see inside. You’ll also want your container to be large enough for the butterfly to spread its wings to dry once it emerges.

Step Two: Harvest Eggs

Your first task is to search for eggs, which monarchs will lay on the underside of milkweed leaves (see sidebar for more info on planting milkweed in your yard). Harvesting eggs is more reliable than collecting caterpillars, since most caterpillars you find will grow into moths, says experienced lepidopterist (butterfly expert), Todd Stout, who owns the website www.RaisingButterflies.org. To locate an egg, simply lift a milkweed leaf and look for a miniscule green bump on the undersurface.

The summer months provide the best opportunity for finding eggs. “Generally it’s June, July, August or September, depending on the arrival time of the monarchs,” says Stout.

Jackie Wilhelm, whose three daughters have successfully nurtured five batches of butterflies enjoys the egg hunt. “It’s fun—that search,” she says. “The eggs are so tiny. It’s a big part of the adventure.”

To best harvest an egg (or eggs), remove the leaf from the plant leaving the egg attached. If the milkweed isn’t growing in your yard you may want to uproot the entire plant (with permission—in most cases you’ll be helping the landowner do their weeding) and transplant it in a pot indoors. This will give you easy access to your caterpillar’s food source, which you’ll need once the egg hatches.

Step Three: Care for Your Caterpillar

Place the leaf and egg in your container. Within a few days it should hatch. Once it hatches you’ll see a tiny worm or larva. Or sometimes before you see the worm you may find holes eaten in the leaf, signaling the larva’s presence.

Watch your caterpillar’s environment carefully during this time. As the leaf gets eaten or wilted, you’ll want to replace it with a fresh leaf. At the same time, you’ll also need to dump the caterpillar’s droppings. Supervise your child during this process. You may want to gently transfer your caterpillar to another container while you freshen up the original one. Then return the caterpillar to its home and carefully replace your ventilated lid.

Step Four: Chrysalis Phase

After about two weeks your caterpillar will stop eating and attach himself to the lid of your container. When the inverted caterpillar takes on a “J” shape, you’ll know he’s ready to spin his pupa or chrysalis. In a day or so, the caterpillar will be completely enveloped in the chrysalis.

At this point your role becomes one of simply protecting the chrysalis. Keep the container safely away from pets and don’t let children move or jostle the container.

Over the 10-day phase the green chrysalis will darken and then become clear. You will begin to recognize the outline and markings of the butterfly’s wings inside the chrysalis.

This phase can be tricky for rearing butterflies, whether ones harvested on your own or bought in a kit. For unknown reasons, not every butterfly will survive beyond the chrysalis. But as Stout says, “understand that butterflies are reproductively prolific creatures. In nature, close to 97 percent of butterflies perish due to natural causes.”

In other words, don’t sweat it if your butterfly doesn’t make it. Simply move on to searching for another egg to tend. In fact, you may want to discuss the possibility of losing a caterpillar when it first hatches. But Wilhelm also encourages parents to remind children of their role.

“Prepare your kids that it doesn’t always work,” she explains. “But talking about responsibility is also a big part of it. You can’t go bringing all these eggs in your home and not follow through with the next steps for making sure it has the best chance of being successful.”

Step Five: Release

One day you’ll likely approach the container to find a fully formed butterfly dangling from the lid of your container. When the butterfly first emerges, its wings will be wet. Let it hang there for at least a few hours or overnight. When you are ready to release the butterfly, move the container outside, preferably somewhere near milkweed plants or other butterfly-friendly flowers. The place you harvested your butterfly eggs makes the ideal spot for your butterfly’s new home. Gently remove the lid with the butterfly still dangling and hold it away from yourself.

As Wilhelm notes, “have your camera ready!” Then watch as your butterfly takes flight and settles among the flowers in its new home.

Butterfly Backyard

According to the National Wildlife Federation, the monarch butterfly’s numbers have declined by approximately 90 percent in recent years—a devastating fact considering they are part of the pollinator family that helps our food grow. The organization’s new Butterfly Hero Campaign encourages families to transform their yards into spaces where butterflies can rest their wings during migration, drink flower nectar and lay their eggs on milkweed.

To participate, visit NWF.org/ButterflyHeroes and submit a photo of your family making the international sign language sign of the butterfly. Those who enter before May 15 will be eligible to win a trip to Walt Disney World. Plus, the first 10,000 participants will receive a free Butterfly Heroes Garden kit, which will include native milkweed seeds to plant in your backyard.

Lara Krupicka and her three daughters have raised monarch butterflies for several years. Her favorite part is the shock she gets every time she finds the newly-emerged butterfly in the container on her kitchen counter.

Tagged > butterflies

When Infertility Interferes With Family Planning

National Infertility Awareness Week is April 19-25. This year’s theme is “You Are Not Alone”. The word “awareness” means the ability to perceive, feel or to be conscious of events, thoughts, emotions or objects. RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association reports that one in eight couples struggles with infertility. Considering that statistic, clearly people are not alone. Then why do we feel so alone when we experience infertility? Why does there seem to still be a lack of awareness? Why does the topic cause such social awkwardness?

My husband and I struggled with infertility for years prior to becoming parents. Also, just in my life I’ve known numerous couples who have grappled with the heart wrenching stress and sorrow of infertility. In the spirit of this year’s theme, real central Arkansas women who have traveled the path of infertility share their thoughts and wisdom with Little Rock Family readers. Our hope is to bring awareness and help others to cope, heal and flourish as women, friends, wives and mothers.

Alison

After dealing with infertility I decided to lead a support group at my church. I met so many fabulous people I am still friends with today. One of the things I always suggested was making sure you have a plan all the way through the process. If one thing doesn’t work, have your next step ready. One of the hardest things is not knowing what to do next. You can have basic steps in mind. Game planning empowers you to make the next step and gives you something to think about and cling to when you’re going through the cycle of not getting pregnant.

It’s also healthy for your relationship with your spouse to put a time limit on how much you talk about the infertility every day. Men need to know the marriage is not lost and your relationship is going to keep going. You are partners in this.

Brittany

The most helpful thing is to be there and listen or if we need to cry—acknowledging the situation and empathizing. Infertility is an awkward and uncomfortable topic. Don’t avoid the topic though because that can be more hurtful. Don’t compare one situation with another, because it’s such an individual journey. Suggestions and advice can get very overwhelming.

We take comfort now in the idea that things don’t always happen on our time and we’re waiting for God to show us when that time is. We’re working on bettering ourselves and preparing for the time that we will be parents. How ever it happens, that’s how God wants it to happen.

Georgia

The worst thing to say to a woman who can’t get pregnant is “You are still young. Just relax. It will happen.” That hurts so badly and dismisses and minimizes our feelings of emptiness and urgency. An empty womb was like not having oxygen to breathe at times. It was a feeling of suffocating and could not be soothed. Most women are born with the desire to bear children and it is feels like such a personal failure when your body will not operate the way it was intended. It crushed my self-esteem. Activities that absorbed my mind helped. Any activity may work as long as it consumes your total thinking.

From a husband’s perspective, the loss of control of not being able to give me what I wanted so badly was tormenting. Being silent when he didn’t know what to say caused great tension because that was misconstrued as not caring. Of course that wasn’t true but it contributed to undercurrents of conflict between us.

Kellie

For us, it was two years of stress, stress, stress. Once we slowed down and realized it was either going to happen or it wasn’t and thought about all of the other options, we eventually became pregnant. It’s easier said than done, but reducing the stress and strain on yourself will help your body.

Mindy

Don’t give up and don’t get bitter. This is a journey for you to find the child that is meant for you and you only. The journey will be hard and at times painful, but it will be worth it. Keep your mind and heart open. Think about adoption and other ways to get YOUR baby. The love and appreciation you will feel when you hold them in your arms will fill and cure the hole inside of you. When you’re going through it, you don’t think you’ll ever be on the other side of it. If only you could know it will be ok.

Infertility Etiquette

Do's Don'ts
Let them know that you care. Don’t tell them to relax.
Be informed and interested. Don’t minimize the problem.
Ask them what they need. Don’t say there are worse things that could happen.
Provide extra outreach to your male friends who may be suffering in silence. Don’t say they’re not meant to be parents.
When appropriate, encourage therapy. Don’t say, “You’re young. You have plenty of time to have a baby.”
Support their choice to stop treatment. Don’t gossip about your friend’s condition.
Attend difficult appointments with them. Don’t complain about your pregnancy.
If you are pregnant, deliver the news thoughtfully. Don’t question their sadness about being unable to conceive.
  Don’t ask whose “fault” it is or assume it’s the female factor.

Tagged > infertility

5 Ways to Slow Down and Enjoy Each Phase of Childhood

9,467,000 minutes. 157,785 hours. 6,574 days. Eighteen years can seem like a long time. Yet childhood with our kids often feels like it will disappear “in the blink of an eye.” To hold back its passage, don’t stop blinking. Instead, check out these five tips from moms and experts on how to prolong and savor each phase of childhood.

Engage Your Child

Margaret Philbrick found reading aloud to her children to be a powerful way to slow down time. Sitting together snuggled on her bed created a cozy nighttime bubble. “It’s good because it chills them out and their minds stop running,” she explains.

For her oldest son (now in college) the habit continued from infancy through high school. But her middle child only agreed to read with her through eighth grade. Then the two switched to weekly dates at a coffee shop.

Philbrick advises, “Engage with your child, no matter what age they are. Do something they love with them, not watching them.” For your child a regular touch point might come in the form of tossing a ball in the back yard or working together on a craft. What you do isn’t as important as finding a common interest in which you can come together over and over across the years.

Celebrate “Lasts”

“Any time there is going to be a ‘last’ I make sure we’re going to be a part of it,” says Barbara Vetter, mother of three. “I can’t say I necessarily look out for them all the time, because some of them just happen and you don’t know it’s going to be the last time. So that makes every one that much more important.”

Being intentional about acknowledging the last time a child will experience something started for Vetter after reading Karen Kingsbury’s book “Let Me Hold You Longer.” In it a mother talks to her young son about how it’s not so much his “firsts” that she wants to take note of (first tooth, first word, first day of school). She details instead the “lasts” she hopes to remember (last baby bottle, last day of kindergarten, last time wearing a high school jersey).

Vetter points out that the end of an era marked by a ‘last’ creates an opportunity to talk with a child about what you remember. In fact, she believes that firsts are about the child, while lasts may be more for parents. She explains, “We naturally track the firsts. They are reaching a milestone, so you want to record it. But maybe with the ‘last’ you are reaching a milestone—the milestone that they are going on to the next stage.”

Mark Off Rites of Passage

Creating traditions around special dates, milestones and ages can help us to pause and notice more. Doing a specific activity on that occasion gives us a point of grounding, an anchor in time that slows us for a moment. One father created a tradition of making a particularly tough mountain climb with each of his daughters on their 13th birthday. The trip gave them time alone together and a great setting to spur contemplation.

Ann Kroeker, author of “Not So Fast: Slow-Down Solutions for Frenzied Families,” shares that on birthdays her family encourages the person being celebrated to offer observations about themselves. “We try to ask questions—the same number of questions as the person’s age. And that has become a fun reflection on the past year and how their interests have changed or stayed the same.”

Create a Time Capsule

Map out the high points and moments of growth in your child’s life on a timeline. Or stash mementos from those occasions in a box for safe keeping. Go back occasionally to update and reflect. Invite your child to contribute their memories and keepsakes too.

Vetter does this with her children. They each have a container in which they store items that are meaningful to them. Periodically she will look through the contents with the child. When her middle child completed elementary school recently, the two took time to reminisce about the highlights—his Cub Scout pinewood derbies, special papers he wrote, awards he won.

Live in the Moment

Because we want to treasure our children’s accomplishments, we can become caught up in recording special events—we’ve all seen the “Mamarazzi” lined up holding video and digital cameras during school performances. But a camera creates a buffer between us and the action. The event passes without us experiencing it.

Make a goal of capturing a few shots or select minutes of footage. Then put the camera down and enjoy. The same goes for editing and preserving: “To spend all of one’s time scrapbooking, writing, or photographing—in other words, to focus too much on chronicling life—could possibly steal from our actual life,” Kroeker says. Create a scrapbook page or two for each memory. Crop a few photos. Write a short entry. Then move on. You’ll have enough pieces to trigger the memories of what you experienced.

The most important key to keeping your kid’s childhood from slipping away is to love them and enjoy the time you have. As Vetter says, “It’s all about the relationship. Having them take a piece of you with them when they go, when they’re done in your home.”

Lara Krupicka is a parenting journalist and mom to three girls who seem to be speeding their way toward growing up.

Local Designer Heather Brister Gives Nostalgic Style New Life

Image by Dean Wheeler

Heather Brister with her daughter, Garrison Brister, 10, who models one of her mother’s designs.

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I always loved the old Sesame Street segment “Who are the people in your neighborhood?” The puppet cast introduced neighborhood kiddos to the occupations and lives of librarians, mailmen and more. It was a vibrant, musical lesson about having a positive sense of community. Central Arkansas’ rich tapestry of folks inspired Little Rock Family’s “The Neighborhood” series. We hope our readers enjoy meeting every month’s featured community member.

Local children’s clothing designer, wife and mother of two, Heather Brister is an excellent example of someone turning creative vision and ingenuity into a fashion reality.

Heather explains, “I have always needed some form of a creative outlet. I don’t really view myself necessarily as having a career in fashion. If I think about what I am doing as fashion, I find myself intimidated—so I just do what I love. I see it is more of an appreciation for design and creating something that hopefully others will appreciate in the same way I do.”

Stitched together in her own words, Heather shares her inspirations and how her career in style got started…

Heather Brister: I began my career simply because I could not find special occasion clothes for my children that completely satisfied me. I wanted something classic and timeless, yet still current. My daughter was getting older, and it seemed as though the only options for her were too sweet or too grown-up. I began searching antique dresses and wondering why more designers didn’t grasp the idea of classic styles for older girls. I purchased a few dresses from the late 1800s, early 1900s from eBay that were in my daughter’s size just to see exactly how they were made.

When I received the dresses, they of course were yellow with age and had many rust spots. I began researching how to restore antique clothing and discovered a process that takes about 3 days of carefully soaking and cleaning the garments. The end result was thrilling. It was as if I had brought life back into these forgotten dresses. It amazed me every single time. I began searching for more dresses that I thought could be restored. I thought this would be my business—restoring and selling antique clothing. Through this process, I found myself also drawn to the styles of the 1940s and ‘50s. When I took home a couple of these dresses and tried them on Garrison, my heart stopped. I loved the way the dresses fit. She seemed to really love the style as well. The problem with these dresses was that the fabrics were very dated, and felt hard and over starched. I began studying how the dresses were put together, and experimenting with different fabrics and ideas of designing the dresses for how we live today. Before I knew it, I had friends asking me where I had gotten the dresses and wanting me to make dresses for their daughters. This gave me the confidence and motivation to move forward and launch Etta Margaret.

When I think about what has consistently inspired me throughout my life as far as design is concerned, I would have to say movies. My mother loves old movies, and she always wanted us to watch them with her when we were younger. I always loved the old black and white movies where the women wore hats and gloves and everyone dressed for dinner. I always loved anything Audrey Hepburn wore. I loved the costume design from “The Philadelphia Story,” “Gone With the Wind,” “Mildred Pierce.” I have always found a great appreciation in how the entire set comes together, everything from the interior design to the fashion. As I grew older, I loved watching John Hughes movies, and how he styled each character—”Pretty in Pink” is still one of my all time faves. I also love Wes Anderson films. The way he puts color together is so gorgeous to me. His movies are a feast for my eyes.

I launched Etta Margaret in September 2012. It began to grow faster than I could handle, and there were many personal issues that kept me from being able to put the time and care I needed into the business. I took a few steps back, and have found a company out of New Orleans that is helping me with making patterns to help with consistency in sizing as well as helping me mass produce the dresses with good quality control. I am hoping to re-launch a full line this fall/winter.

Being a mother is so difficult because you feel the responsibility of raising these little people with all of the love and attention you feel they need. It is easy to forget about yourself and your own needs. I found it hard to separate myself from my children. As they grew older, I saw the importance of allowing them to be who they needed to be without me guiding them every step of the way. I also saw the importance of showing them that you can always make dreams for yourself come true. I believe fear has held me back a lot in my life—fear in many different forms. It may be fear of failure, or fear of not giving every moment I had to my family and somehow ruining their future. It just hit me one day that life is too short and too precious to continually worry and fear. I would hate to reach the end of my life and feel regret because I didn’t try. It’s scary to take chances, but I have come to the conclusion that the agony of regret is much worse than the actual act of failing. The times I have failed, I have always learned something about myself during the process.

Arree Chung To Present His Children's Book, 'Ninja!' at 2015 Arkansas Literary Festival

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Not unlike Maxwell, the main character of his first work “Ninja!,” author/illustrator Arree Chung always had a secret alter ego. Raised by Chinese immigrant parents in the Bay Area of California, he initially followed their expectations to pursue a stable, bankable course of study and profession. All the while, however, his childlike artistic spirit was raising a ruckus inside of him.

In 2003 he left Pixar Studios to enter art school; there, he took a class on children’s book illustration and knew immediately this was where he wanted to express his art. Published last June, “Ninja!” is the first of a three-book deal with publisher Henry Holt & Co. Chung will visit Little Rock as one of the featured authors during the Arkansas Literary Festival. Before you meet him at the free kids event on April 25, learn more about the author and his inspirations.

Little Rock Family: It’s not easy to create a story that holds a child’s attention and yet has something to say!

Arree Chung: I think a lot of people think that writing stories for kids is easy. Certainly making up a story is fun and it can be easy, but making a really refined, good story is actually very, very difficult—especially to make the ones that resonate with people.

For “Ninja!” the real emotional truth of it is being lost in a fantasy. What rings true, I think, for a lot of boys and girls that play at home is they play in this mundane space. So crafting the story for “Ninja!” was about finding that emotional truth of being so lost in your world and crafting your own world in your head.

How do you make sure you’re hitting that authentic chord with kids?

A lot of our friend and family get-togethers now are around kids’ birthday parties and whatnot. Whenever we go to these parties I end up playing with the kids. I get a lot of my ideas from hanging out with them and just being youthful.

I think when you get older, you don’t want to be immature, but you want to maintain that curiosity. So I try to do that and that’s why making books for children is so fun—that curiosity and excitement about life just comes out naturally.

Was it a conscious choice to make “Ninja” a series of adventures?

It wasn’t really a conscious choice. But when you work on something for so long, all these new stories come up into your head and you write them down and hope the first book does well so you can make more.

LRF: Are you an artist who writes or are you a writer who draws?

I think of myself more as a storyteller in general. I was very drawn to making art to tell stories. Usually I end up doodling on a lot of copy paper and I write and I draw at the same time, which works perfectly for picture books because it’s about the relationship between the words and pictures.

Have your parents come around to this career?

Unfortunately my dad passed away a few years before I had my opportunity to break through as a picture book artist, although he did see me become successful as an art director. I think his biggest concern was, just as all parents, “can my kid make a living and will they be self-sufficient?” It was really good for him to see that I could make a living doing art.

My mom is so proud; she tells everyone and she buys people books and her friends have me autograph books all the time. She has always been very, very supportive.

Do you find it ironic that as a children’s book author you teach children to follow their dreams, yet that is the very thing you didn’t do yourself for many years?

I’m thankful that, even though I did it a little bit later, that I did it. You know that 10,000 rule: It takes 10,000 hours or about 10 years to be really good at something. If it’s 10 years, even if you start when you’re 40, you’ve become really good at something by the time you’re 50, and you’re making great work when you’re 60. It’s never too late.

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Literature for Little Ones

A wide spectrum of authors and subject matter comprise this year’s Arkansas Literary Festival, slated for April 23-26. Many of the events are free and highlights among the nearly 80 authors and presenters include John Waters’ one-man show, “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood”-author Rebecca Wells and many more. A few of this year’s family events include:

  • Arree Chung will read from “Ninja!” and demonstrate how to draw his character Maxwell. Activities with Unity Martial Arts will follow. 10 a.m. April 25, CALS Children’s Library & Learning Center.
  • Bryan Collier, winner of multiple Coretta Scott King Awards and Caldecott honors, discusses his works “Uptown” and ‘Trombone Shorty.” 1 p.m. April 25, CALS Children’s Library and Learning Center.
  • E. Lockhart, author of the top-reviewed 2014 book for young adults, chats about “We Were Liars.” 11 a.m. April 25, CALS Main Library, Teen Center.
  • Scott Sampson, beloved host of the hit PBS KIDS television series Dinosaur Train, visits with kids. Expect a special appearance by a costumed character from the show! 11:30 a.m. April 25, CALS Ron Robinson Theater.

For more information on tickets, venues and other attractions, visit ArkansasLiteraryFestival.org. Little Rock Family is a proud media sponsor of the Arkansas Literary Festival, and the sponsor of Arree Chung as a featured author/illustrator at this year’s event.

2015 Little Rock Family Guide to Summer Day Camps & Classes

The final school bell rings – school’s out for summer! Now what? Plan your child care, enrichment opportunities, and old-fashioned, outdoor fun with help from our ultimate guide to day camps and classes. Looking for overnight camps? See our full list of sleepover camps here.

Click on a category below to browse the list:

Arts

General

Athletics

Outdoors

Enrichment

Vacation Bible
School

(All area codes (501) unless otherwise noted. denotes advertiser.)

Arts

Art Machines: Kinetic Sculpture
Arkansas Arts Center, 501 E. 9th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-4000 | Info@ArkansasArtsCenter.org
Dates: July 27-31, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 10-14
Cost: $198 members, $247.50 future members

Harness the kinetic power of simple forces to create art like you never have before. Tinker with strings and hinges, wood, wheels and weights to build simple drawing machines that slide and swing marks across the paper. Tuition includes materials.

Art Through the Ages: Art History Walk 
Arkansas Arts Center, 501 E. 9th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-4000 | Info@ArkansasArtsCenter.org
Dates: July 20-24, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 6-9
Cost: $198 members, $247.50 future members

From cave paintings to computer art, students travel through time as they create artwork the way people did from thousands of years ago to today. Learn different ways of drawing, painting and sculpting from the many cultures of the world. Tuition includes materials.

If It’s Paper: Paper-Based Art Making
Arkansas Arts Center, 501 E. 9th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-4000 | Info@ArkansasArtsCenter.org
Dates: July 6-10, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 6-9
Cost: $198 members, $247.50 future members

From pulp to paperback, this week is all about paper. Students cover everything from how paper is made to all the fun things you can make with it! Join the Arts Center for an exciting class in paper-making, printmaking, origami, shadow puppets and bookmaking. Tuition includes materials.

Junior Arts Academy
Arkansas Arts Center, 501 E. 9th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-4000| Info@ArkansasArtsCenter.org
Dates: June 8-19, 9 a.m-5 p.m.
Ages: 6-9
Cost: $396 members, $495 non-members; payment plans and scholarships available

In connection with the traveling exhibition “30 Americans,” and the Arkansas Arts Center’s companion exhibition “Art as Activism,” this year’s program theme is “The ABC’s of Me: Using the arts to celebrate culture, identity and creativity.” The session culminates with “Play & Display” where young thespians perform original, short plays on the Children’s Theatre Main Stage, and the artwork they create is on display in the Arkansas Arts Center.

Playing with Layers: Mixed Media Techniques
Arkansas Arts Center, 501 E. 9th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-4000 | Info@ArkansasArtsCenter.org
Dates: Aug. 3-7, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 6-9
Cost: $198 members, $247.50 future members

Mixed Media artwork is the most fun to make. Take a little of this, and a little of that, and put it together any way you want! Each new layer adds another dimension. Campers discover the art elements of shape and texture, and practice new skills and invent their own techniques with an exciting range of tools for art making. Tuition includes materials.

Summer Theatre Academy
Arkansas Arts Center Children’s Theatre, 501 E. 9th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-4000| Info@ArkansasArtsCenter.org
Dates: Session 1: June 22-July 10, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Session 2: July 20-Aug. 7, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 10-18
Cost: $575

Summer Theatre Academy is a three-week, audition-only theater training program. Students learn theater performing techniques under the direction of skilled theater professionals from across the country. Auditions will be held April 12 and May 3 at 5 p.m.

Super Symbols: Visual Storytelling
Arkansas Arts Center, 501 E. 9th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-4000 | Info@ArkansasArtsCenter.org
Dates: July 13-17, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 10-14
Cost: $198 members, $247.50 future members

This visual storytelling camp is all about art and writing. Draw and paint in the styles of graphic novels and comic book art to create visual poetry. Define your own visual vocabulary and use it to encode messages in your paintings. Tuition includes materials.

Ballet Arkansas Little Rock Junior Intensive and Dance Camp
Ballet Arkansas Studios, 520 Main St., Little Rock
(501) 223-5150
Dates: June 15-19; Junior Intensive: 12:30-5 p.m.; Dance Camp: 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Junior Intensive: ages 9-13; Dance Camp: ages 5-8
Cost: $150

During the morning Dance Camp, young dancers ages 5-8 will focus on Cinderella, The Story Ballet, through video examples, reading of the story, and the crafting of Cinderella props. Dancers will participate in rehearsal to prepare for the showcase at the end of the week. Then, in the Junior Intensive session, dancers ages 9-13 will take classes in ballet technique, pre-pointe/pointe, contemporary, jazz, variations, modern, and pilates/stretch.

Musical Theater Camp
First United Methodist Church, 723 Center St., Little Rock
(501) 372-2256 | JLChurchwell@FUMCLR.org
Dates: June 22-26, 12:30-4:30 pm
Ages: Grades 3-7
Cost: $30

Students will learn music and choreography, build stage sets and backdrops, and work on costumes for a musical. The camp will end with a performance on Friday evening. There is a limit of 40 participants. Cost includes all materials for the musical as well as a mid-afternoon snack; campers must bring a sack lunch every day if you are attending VBS in the morning.

Junior Drama Camps
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: June 1-5, 15-19; July 13-17, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Grades 7-9
Cost: $210 ($50 discount for attending a second camp)

Students will work on their own one-act production, which will be performed on the last day of class for parents and friends. Students will write the script, design the set and costumes, cast parts and develop blocking.

Senior Drama Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: Aug. 3-7, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Grades 10-12
Cost: $210 ($50 discount for attending a second camp)

Students will work on their own one-act production, which will be performed on the last day of class for parents and friends. Students will write the script, design the set and costumes, cast parts and develop blocking.

T Tauri Movie Camp
2005 White Drive/334 E. Main St., Locust Grove
(870) 251-1189 | TTauri@Wildblue.net
Dates: July 13-25
Ages: Rising grades 4-12
Cost: $60-$100, depending on length

This year’s workshops are music video, depicting zombies, script to screen, and cut paper stop-motion animation. Workshops run from two to four days each and do not overlap, so children can participate in multiple workshops. The program ends with a public screening of the videos created in the workshops. Workshop fees include all supplies and a T Tauri Movie Camp T-shirt. Classes will be held at the University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville and the Landers Theater Building in Batesville.

Ballet Arkansas Little Rock Summer Intensives
UALR Center for the Performing Arts, 2801 South University Ave., Little Rock
(501) 223-5150
Dates: July 6-10, July 13-17; 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Ages: 13 and up
Cost: $325 per student (1 week); $550 per student (both weeks); full tuition scholarships available

Dancers will take a variety of classes including ballet technique, pointe/variations, jazz, modern, Pilates/stretch, stage make-up, and repertoire. The Little Rock summer intensives will be taught by the Ballet Arkansas ballet mistress and company members, as well as by the guest instructors Juan Carlos Claudio from the University of Utah’s Modern Dance Department (week 1) and Anthony Krutzkamp from the Kansas City Ballet (week 2). Auditions for the summer intensive will take place 10 a.m.-noon April 18.

The Art of Play Camp
Little Rock School of the Arts, 6711 W. Markham St., Little Rock
(501) 663-5212
Dates: June 29-July 2, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Grades K-6
Cost: $99

In this drama workshop, students will learn the basics of acting. Each day will be packed full of fun and hands-on learning, exploring the theme "Fractured Fairy Tales." Each day includes snacks, as well as time for recess. After-care until 5 p.m. is available.

Instrumental Program-Wildwood Academy of Music
Wildwood Park for the Arts, 20919 Denny Road, Little Rock
(501) 821-7275 | Sofia@WildwoodPark.org
Dates: June 8-July 3, 9 a.m.3- p.m.
Ages: 6-12
Cost: $250/week; Orchestra, Piano & Chamber: $750/session; Orchestra only: $375

WAMA’s Instrumental Program lets students collaborate and perform music appropriate to their experience and ability. Sessions are divided into orchestra, piano and chamber music, and orchestra and chamber music. From strings to brass, winds to percussion, there is a place for students interested in becoming better musicians.

Vocal Program-Wildwood Academy of Music & the Arts
Wildwood Park for the Arts, 20919 Denny Road, Little Rock
(501) 821-7275| Sofia@WildwoodPark.org
Dates: July 6-31
Ages: 6-13; advanced singers: 13-18
Cost: $250/week (beginners), $500/session (intermediate & advanced)

WAMA’s Vocal Program introduces beginning, intermediate and advanced students to a range of repertoire while demonstrating and encouraging a healthy voice through appropriate techniques. Students will work with other musicians to grow and become more confident in using their instruments.

Henderson State University Band Camp (Junior I)
Russell Fine Arts Center, 1100 Henderson St., Arkadelphia
(800) 228-7333 | BandCamp@HSU.edu
Dates: June 16-20
Ages: Students with one year of school band experience
Cost: $325 (on campus June 17-21), $190 (off campus)

This marks the 50th anniversary of Henderson State University’s band camps. The Junior I camp is for students who have had one year in band.

Henderson State University Band Camp (Junior II)
Russell Fine Arts Center, 1100 Henderson St., Arkadelphia
(800) 228-7333| | BandCamp@HSU.edu
Dates: June 23-27
Ages: Students who have had two and three years of school band experience
Cost: $325 (on campus June 24-28). $190 (off campus)

This marks the 50th anniversary of Henderson State University’s band camps. The Junior II camp is for students who have had their second and third year of school band experience.

Henderson State University Band Camp (Senior High Camp)
Russell Fine Arts Center, 1100 Henderson St., Arkadelphia
(800) 228-7333 | BandCamp@HSU.edu
Dates: July 5-11
Ages: Grades 9-12
Cost: $340 (on campus July 6-12), $190 (off campus)

This marks the 50th anniversary of Henderson State University’s band camps. The Junior II camp is for students who have had their second and third year of school band experience.

Movie Martial Arts
Unity Martial Arts, 3016 W. Markham St., Little Rock
(501) 664-0604| | Info@UnityMartialArts.com
Dates: July 6-10, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Ages 2-7
Cost: Call for details; discounts available for siblings and repeat campers

Learn about fantasy fight scenes and movie magic. Groups will write, storyboard and shoot their own action scenes. Movies will be screened at the end of camp.

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Athletics

Anytime Summertime Kids’ Camp at The Little Gym of Little Rock
1121 S. Bowman Road, Little Rock
(501) 225-5437| | Erin@TLGLR.com
Dates: June 15-Aug. 14
Ages: 3-10
Cost: Varies

Summer and holiday camps offer three hours of fun and activities that combine physical fitness and play with arts, crafts and special events. The summer camp schedule will be available soon.

♦ Baseball Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: July 6-8, 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Rising grades 1-8
Cost: $125

Join one of the many summer sports camps offered by Little Rock Christian Academy. This program is directed by Coach Lane.

♦ Lil Warrior Boys Basketball Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: July 13-15, 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Grades 1-3
Cost: $125

Join one of the many summer sports camps offered by Little Rock Christian Academy. Coach Rogers heads this program.

♦ Boys Basketball Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: July 13-15
Ages: Grades 4-7
Cost: $125

Sign up for one of many sports camps at Little Rock Christian Academy. This program for boys is run by Head Warriors Coach Trembley.

♦ Girls Basketball Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: June 8-10, noon-3 p.m.
Ages: Grades 4-6
Cost: $125

Join one of the many summer sports camps offered by Little Rock Christian Academy. This girls’ basketball program is directed by LRCA’s own Coach Rogers.

 Football Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: July 22-23, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m.
Ages: Grades 3-6
Cost: $85

Little Rock Christian Academy’s Football Camp gives an opportunity for young athletes to get familiar with football and the academy’s program, in addition giving our staff a chance to connect with tomorrow’s Warriors.

 Boys/Girls Soccer Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: May 26-28, 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Grades 1-6
Cost: $125

Join one of the many summer sports camps offered by Little Rock Christian Academy. Head boys soccer Coach McCaskill leads this program.

♦ Girls Volleyball Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: June 15-17, 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Grades 3-6
Cost: $125

Join one of the many summer sports camps offered by Little Rock Christian Academy. Head volleyball Coach Lacey Rowan leads this camp.

UALR Baseball Youth Team Camp
2801 S. University Ave. (Gary Hogan Field/Indoor Facility), Little Rock
(501) 280-0759| | PaMaus@UALR.edu
Dates: By appointment
Ages: Any age
Cost: $200 per session

The team camps allow youth teams to learn from UALR Trojans coaching staff and players. Each youth team’s coaching staff will help in the practice session so that they can continue these types of practices outside of team camp atmosphere. The fundamental periods will be extensive, including hitting, pitching, catching, fielding, team defense and base running.

Junior Team Tennis
2024 Arkansas Valley Drive, Ste. 302, Little Rock
(501) 227-7611 | Brittany@ArkTennis.com
Dates: April-June
Ages: Ages 5-18
Cost: Varies; a $20 USTA junior membership is required; financial aid is available.

Teams are co-ed and made up of at least six players based on similar age and skill levels. The emphasis is on skill development, teamwork and friendly competition. The USTA Junior Team Tennis State Championships are July 17-19 in North Little Rock.

Sonshine Academy
2415 Donaghey Ave., Conway
(501) 327-7742| | Info@SonshineAcademy.com
Dates: May 15-Aug. 14
Ages: Swim: 9 months & up; all other programs: 18 months & up
Cost: Varies

Sonshine Academy offers a variety of instructional summer camps for both boys and girls. Programs offered will be cheerleading, gymnastics, trampoline, tumbling, parkour, theater, preschool gymnastics, sports fitness and more. There is also a day camp for school-age children in need of full-time care. Swimming lessons are also available.

Sports and Educational Summer Camp
River City Gymnastics, 5310 S. Shackleford Road, Little Rock
(501) 407-8000 | CoachGrady75@gmail.com
Dates: Call for available weeks.
Ages: Grades K-5
Cost: $145/week

River City Gymnastics’ Sports and Educational Summer Camp is packed full of exciting activities that keep your child’s health and fitness in mind. Activities include weekly field trips, arts and crafts, physical fitness, games and much more. Registration is open through May 1.

Harding Softball Summer Fundamental Camp
Harding University Softball Field, Burks Boulevard & Bison Lane, Searcy
(501) 279-4407 | Sports@Harding.edu
Dates: June 1-4, 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Grades K-7
Cost: $80

This camp will focus on fundamentals and skill development in throwing, fielding, hitting, base running, pitching and catching.

Harding Baseball Summer Fundamentals Camp
Jerry Moore Field, Harding University, Searcy
(501) 279-4407 | PMcGaha@Harding.edu
Dates: June 1-4, 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Rising grades K-6
Cost: $80

This camp will work on the development of each player’s individual skills, encourage an understanding of and participation in baseball, and an understanding of team concepts and fundamentals, hustle and attitude.

UCA Soccer Academy Summer Day Camp  
600 S. Donaghey Ave., Conway
(501) 450-3150 | RDuncan@UCA.edu
Dates: June 1-4, 9-11 a.m.
Ages: 4-9
Cost: $70; $5 per child discount for three or more siblings

These day camps introduce players to basic soccer techniques–dribbling, passing, shooting, etc –through a “games and activities” approach to learning while having fun. Campers should bring a soccer ball, proper shoes, shin guards, sun block and water.

UCA Nike Tennis Camp
201 Donaghey Ave., UCA Tennis Complex, Conway
(501) 450-3150 |  CWharton@UCA.edu
Dates: June 1-5, July 27-31
Ages: Tournament training: 9-18; High school training: 13-18; 10 and under: 5-10
Cost: Half day: $185; Full day: $310

UCA Nike Tennis Camps is offering two weeks of full day (9 a.m.-4 p.m.) and half day (9 a.m.-noon) camp for players ages 5-18 of all skill levels. A Tournament Training program will also be offered during the first session and a High School Training program during the second session. Register online here.

Arkansas Football Junior High Day Camp
350 N. Razorback Road (Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium), Fayetteville
(479) 575-6533 | PaWeiden@uark.edu
Dates: June 11, 8 a.m.-3:45 p.m.
Ages: Rising grades 5-8
Cost: $105

This non-padded, skills, technique and fundamentals camp with 7-on-7 games is broken up by age group.

Arkansas Football Specialist Camp
350 N. Razorback Road (Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium), Fayetteville
(479) 575-6533 | PaWeiden@uark.edu
Dates: June 13, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Ages: Rising grades 9-12
Cost: $105

Kicking coach Jamie Kohl and his staff will run this clinic aimed at punters, kickers and long snappers. Players should bring T-shirt, shorts, kicking shoes, kicking T’s and sunscreen.

Build Your Own Super Hero 1 & 2
Unity Martial Arts, 3016 W. Markham St., Little Rock
(501) 664-0604 | Info@UnityMartialArts.com
Dates: June 8-12; July 13-17
Ages: Grades K-2
Cost: $225 per week

Younger students engage in activities, games, crafts, and story play as they create their own super hero, and then learn about teamwork as they battle a super villain to save the city.

Harding University Baseball Elite Camps
Jerry Moore Field, Harding University, Searcy
(501) 279-4407 | PMcGaha@Harding.edu
Dates: June 7-10, June 14-17
Ages: Rising grades 9-12
Cost: $375 (resident), $300 (commuter)

Players can experience the day to day operations of college athletics. There will be large amounts of workout time and individual instruction. Campers will be exposed to every phase of the Harding baseball program, which will include practice/game sessions, weight training, classroom and video sessions. Organized games will be played at night.

Straightright Fitness
301 S. Bowman Road, Little Rock
(501) 223-8333 | StraightRight@att.net
Dates: June 8-12, 1:30-3 p.m.
Ages: 9-12
Cost: $85

This all sport cross-training camp will take your 9- to 12-year-old through daily activities that will improve their speed, agility & endurance in a fun, safe and positive atmosphere.

Adventure Quest 1 at Unity Martial Arts
3016 W. Markham St., Little Rock
(501) 664-0604 | Info@UnityMartialArts.com
Dates: June 15-19, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Ages: Grades 1-6
Cost: $250; Discounts are available for siblings and repeat campers.

Students will construct padded weapons, solve puzzles and problems, and fight their way through a plot in this interactive game that involves its participants with martial arts. The choices they make will shape the story’s conclusion.

Arkansas Football Youth Day Camp
350 N. Razorback Road (Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium), Fayetteville
(479) 575-6533 | PaWeiden@uark.edu
Dates: June 18, 8-11:30 a.m.
Ages: Rising grades 1-4
Cost: $55

Age-appropriate drills will be run by current Razorback athletes and coaching staff. There will be an autograph session with current players. Attendees should wear T-Shirt, shorts, shoes and sunscreen.

Arkansas United Soccer Development Camp
Murray Park, Little Rock
(501) 603-9880 | Info@ArkansasUnited.com
Dates: June 15-17, 5:30-8 p.m.
Ages: U9-U12
Cost: $99

This intermediate-level camp is for boys and girls in academy level programs. The curriculum is centered around intense skills development based on the club development model. Players receive training designed to develop and enhance 1v1 skills, passing and receiving, speed, finishing, and group attacking.

Arkansas United Soccer Mighty Mites Camp
Murray Park, Little Rock
(501) 603-9880 | Info@ArkansasUnited.com
Dates: June 15-17, 8:30-10 a.m.
Ages: U6-U8
Cost: $99

This camp is designed for girls and boys with zero to three years of experience. Each session will introduce players to the rules of the game and teach basic soccer skills, coordination and movement, and social interaction with teammates.

Golf Camp
The Country Club of Arkansas, 3 Country Club Circle, Maumelle
(501) 425-1067
Dates: June 16-19, July 14-17
Ages: Ages 7-14
Cost: $80 per camp per child

Kids and teens can learn the fundamentals of golfing during these two camps. Contact Ann Baker, PGA pro, for more details.

Hero Wars 1 & 2 at Unity Martial Arts
3016 W. Markham St., Little Rock
(501) 664-0604 | Info@UnityMartialArts.com
Dates: June 15-19, June 22-25, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Teens only

Model UN meets Skyrim: To navigate an epic role-playing game, campers will earn extra development points by helping the Adventure Quest students who will be meeting simultaneously.

Life CHAMPS Football Camps I & II
War Memorial Stadium, 1 Stadium Drive, Little Rock
(501) 255-0950 | Tai@LifeChamps.com
Dates: June 15-19, July 13-17
Ages: Camp 1: Grades K-3; Camp II: Grades 4-6
Cost: Camp 1: $75 (early registration), $110 (regular registration); Camp II $110 (early registration), $125 (regular registration)

Life CHAMPS offers a youth football camp this summer at War Memorial Stadium. The football camp, instructed by former Razorback and professional football players, will be a developmental camp to help develop and strengthen skills and abilities. Campers will receive individual instruction on the fundamentals of the game of football and the game of life. Campers will also get to compete against another. A Character Athlete will be chosen from among the campers.

UALR Boys’ and Girls’ Individual Skills Soccer Camp
5801 Asher Ave. (Coleman Sports & Recreation Complex), Little Rock
(501) 569-3167| | AlBlewitt@UALR.edu
Dates: June 15-18 (half day: 9 a.m.-noon; full day: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.)
Ages: Half day: 5-6; Full day: 7-15
Cost: $120 (half day), $190 (full day)

This camp focuses on the technical and mechanical training of the individual player. Improvement on the vital skills involved in the sport like shooting, crossing, passing, control, heading, and finishing are emphasized. The afternoon sessions concentrate on larger group training and game related situations. Each day finishes with a “World Cup Tournament.” The camp is designed for any ability level, with players grouped by age and ability levels.

Adventure Quest 2 at Unity Martial Arts
3016 W. Markham, Little Rock
(501) 664-0604 | Info@UnityMartialArts.com
Dates: June 22-25, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Grades 1-6
Cost: $250

This camp is the final chapter of this year’s story, an interactive game acted out through martial arts and movement. Much like Adventure Quest 1, students will make padded weapons, solve puzzles and problems, and fight their way to the story’s conclusion.

UALR Basketball Camps
Jack Stephens Center, 2801 S. University Ave., Little Rock
(501) 569-8927 | SteveShieldsBasketball@Gmail.com
Dates: June 22-25, June 29-July 2, July 13-16
Ages: Rising grades K-12
Cost: $185 (Before June 1)

The UALR coaching staff will host three sessions at the Jack Stephens Center this summer. Each session will feature a morning mini-camp for kids entering grades K-3 and an afternoon session for children entering grades 4-12. Because of NCAA rules, the third session (July 13-16) will be available only for campers entering grades K-7.

Summer Elite Multi-Day Camp - Harding Softball
Harding University Softball Field, Burks Boulevard & Bison Lane, Searcy
(501) 279-4407 | Sports@Harding.edu
Dates: June 22-24
Ages: Grades 8-12
Cost: $325 (resident), $250 (commuter)

This camp will focus on both individual and team skill development for competitive players. Campers will receive skill instruction in all defensive position groups (pitching, catching, corner infield, middle infield and outfield). Offensive skills taught include hitting, slapping, bunting, and base running. Campers will be also be divided into competitive teams and participate in games and/or scrimmages.

Trojan Soccer College ID Camp
2801 S. University Ave., Little Rock
(501) 569-3167 | AlBlewitt@UALR.edu, BkGarcia@UALR.edu
Dates: June 27-28
Ages: Grades 8-12
Cost: $150

This camp will provide players the opportunity to display their talents to the UALR coaching staff. College level training sessions will be performed by the Trojans coaching staff.

UA Volleyball Lil Backs Camp
University of Arkansas, 1 Stadium Drive, Fayetteville
(479) 575-4587| | UAVBCamp@UArk.edu
Dates: June 29-July 1
Ages: Grades 4-7
Cost: $95

Join the Razorbacks for a three-day commuter camp specifically for younger kids looking to learn the game.

UA Volleyball Position Camp
University of Arkansas, 1 Stadium Drive, Fayetteville
(479) 575-4587 | UAVBCamp@UArk.edu
Dates: July 6
Ages: Grades 7-12
Cost: $95

This camp will give players the chance to train in their specific position. Training will be provided for the following: middle blockers, outside hitters, liberos & defensive specialists and setters.

UA Volleyball Teams Camp
University of Arkansas, 1 Stadium Drive, Fayetteville
(479) 575-4587 | RPulliza@UArk.edu
Dates: July 10-12 (JV/Varsity), July 14-16 (Varsity only)
Ages: Junior Varsity, Varsity
Cost: $220 commuter; $245 resident

This camp will give teams an opportunity to train and prepare for the upcoming season. Players will have the chance to work on fundamentals and situational play to help develop team chemistry. There will be a good balance of scrimmages and “team practice” before the camp tournament. Each team must be accompanied by a coach.

University of Arkansas Volleyball All Skills Camp
1 Stadium Drive, Fayetteville
(479) 575-4587 | UAVBCamp@UArk.edu
Dates: July 7-9
Ages: Grades 8-12
Cost: $245 commuter; $275 resident

This is for players looking to develop their skills as they prepare for the upcoming season. This camp will challenge them by focusing on the fundamentals of forearm passing, serving, setting, blocking, attacking and defense. Campers will be grouped by skill level and age range.  

Arkansas Volleyball-Serving Clinic
1 Stadium Drive, Fayetteville
(479) 575-4587 | UAVBCamp@UArk.edu
Dates: July 18
Ages: All ages
Cost: $30

This clinic hosted by the Razorbacks will focus on the physical fundamentals of serving.

Boys Junior Academy Summer Residential Camp - UCA Soccer Academy
600 S. Donaghey Ave., Conway
(501) 450-3150 | RDuncan@UCA.edu
Dates: July 12-16
Ages: 10-14
Cost: $400 (overnight), $340 (commuter)

The Boys Junior Academy will feature local club and high school instructors. Current and former UCA players will help the staff coaches all week long. A specifically designed curriculum will emphasize the development of the individual player. A daily schedule of individual, small group and team instruction will feature the best and most effective training techniques available. Evening games will provide the opportunity to apply what athletes have learned.

Boys Senior Academy Summer Residential Camp - UCA Soccer Academy
600 S. Donaghey Ave., Conway
(501) 450-3150 | RDuncan@UCA.edu
Dates: July 12-16
Ages: 15-19
Cost: $450 (overnight), $390 (commuter)

The Boys Senior Academy will feature a more intense and physically demanding week of instruction for the player looking to be evaluated and trained like a college soccer player.

Summer Elite Camp - UCA Soccer Academy
600 S. Donaghey Ave., Conway
(501) 450-3150 | RDuncan@UCA.edu
Dates: July 17-19
Ages: 15-19
Cost: $275
The Summer Elite Camp provides an accelerated and intense soccer environment for the experienced field player or goalkeeper. The curriculum emphasizes technique, tactics and small-sided play along with competitive matches where campers are instructed and evaluated by the staff. The primary focus in this camp is to provide instruction and give players the best chance to showcase their abilities.

UA Volleyball Junior High Play Day
University of Arkansas, 1 Stadium Drive, Fayetteville
(479) 575-4587 | UAVBCamp@UArk.edu
Dates: July 18
Ages: Junior high school
Cost: $20 per camper

This camp is a one-day tournament with pool play in the morning and bracket play in the afternoon. Each team will be guaranteed at least 5 matches for the day. Players and teams will prepare for the upcoming season while competing against other schools. Each team must be accompanied by a coach.

Unity Martial Arts Ranking Camp
Unity Martial Arts, 3016 W. Markham, Little Rock
(501) 664-0604 | Info@UnityMartialArts.com
Dates: July 20-24, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Grades 2-7
Cost: Call for details; discounts available for siblings or repeat campers

This camp is great for students who seriously want to advance their karate skills; intensive lessons focus on Cuong Nhu martial arts for all levels.

Arkansas United Goalkeeper & Finishing Soccer Camp
Murray Park, Little Rock
(501) 603-9880 | Info@ArkansasUnited.com
Dates: July 27-29, 5:30-8 p.m.
Ages: Girls and boys ages U9-U16
Cost: $99

This camp has two areas of focus. Goalkeepers will be instructed in proper techniques and body mechanics, with areas covered to include shot stopping, footwork, positioning, breakaways and more. The camp for those interested in learning how to finish and score goals like Ronaldo or Messi will be instructed in techniques and mechanics including power, accuracy, chipping the goalkeeper, line drives and more. Each session will bring both groups together to practice what they are trying to achieve: stopping goals and scoring goals.

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Enrichment

♦ Agape Academy Summer Program
Agape Academy, 701 Napa Valley, Little Rock
(501) 225-0612 | Children@Agape-Church.org
Dates: Call for details
Ages: K3-rising grade 5
Cost: Varies

Each week includes a new theme, arts and crafts, on-campus activities and field trips.

♦ Summer at AB
Arkansas Baptist, Lower School: 62 Pleasant Valley Drive; Upper School: 8400 Ranch Blvd., Little Rock
(501) 868-5121, ext. 245
Dates: May 26-July 16
Ages: entering grades K-12

Campers have fun while participating in fun activities that build skills in academics, arts, athletics and technology.

♦ Summer Daze at Episcopal Collegiate
Episcopal Collegiate School, 1701 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 372-1194 | Rolive@EpiscopalCollegiate.org
Dates: June 1-July 31
Ages: PreK-12
Cost: Varies

Episcopal offers a total of 48 classes this summer, including enrichment, academic and athletic offerings. Episcopal will also offer Discovery Day Camp for rising PreK-4 through 5th grade students. Day Camp will focus on STEM learning and engineering.

♦ Pioneer Day Camp - “Expedition Arkansas”
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. 3rd St., Little Rock
(501) 324-9351 | Reservations@HistoricArkansas.org
Dates: June 15-19, 8 a.m.-noon (rising grades 3-4); June 22-26, 8 a.m.-noon (rising grades 5-6)
Ages: Rising grades 3-6
Cost: $85 per camper ($65 for museum members)

This year’s theme for Pioneer Day Camp is “Expedition Arkansas.” Through interactive activities and special guests, day campers will learn about explorers in Arkansas during the 1800s and the plants, animals and rocks they discovered. Campers will learn about botanists, geologists, chemists, ornithologists, illustrators, and writers who traveled to early Arkansas.

♦ Little Rock Christian Academy Summer Programs 2015
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: May 26-Aug. 7
Ages: Grades K4-12
Cost: Varies by program; discounts available to those attending multiple camps

The academy offers a variety of camps and courses that focus on drama, sports, mathematics, pop culture and more.

♦ Babysitting 101
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822
Dates: June 8-12, June 15-19
Ages: Grades 5-7
Cost: $140

Learn how to provide care for infants and children, stay safe, handle emergencies, choose age-appropriate activities, recognize and handle a variety of behaviors, and start and manage your own babysitting business. Campers will practice changing diapers, create activities to play with kids, and even create business cards. Students will complete the online babysitting course through the American Red Cross.

♦ College Boot Camp
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822 | Carla.Kenyon@LittleRockChristian.com
Dates: June 23-25, July 7-9, July 21-23
Ages: Rising seniors
Cost: $295

This workshop is designed to help rising seniors prepare their college applications in order to have them ready to submit in early fall. Students will complete applications (including edited essays), write and polish resumes, talk with college reps and more. Sessions are Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Thursdays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

♦ Museum of Discovery Summer Camps
500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 150, Little Rock
(501) 396-7050 |  BNelsen@MuseumOfDiscovery.org
Dates: June 8-July 31, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 4-13
Cost: Varies

Get your hands on fun and discover the worlds of movie-making, engineering an amusement park, fire and ice, and LEGOs! Can’t decide? Try Science Sampler Week for a little bit of everything. Discovery Camps will also be held as an introduction to camp for kids age 4-6 every Wednesday morning.

♦ Middle School University at Pulaski Academy
Pulaski Academy, 12701 Hinson Road, Little Rock
(501) 604-1907 | Donna.Horton@PulaskiAcademy.org
Dates: June 1-July 17
Ages: Rising grades 6-8
Cost: $34/day

A unique summer camp for middle school students is designed around life skills, fun adventures and enrichment classes.

♦ Summer at the Academy
Pulaski Academy, 12701 Hinson Road, Little Rock
Donna.Horton@PulaskiAcademy.org
Dates: June 1-July 17
Ages: Rising grades PK3-10
Cost: Day Camp is $34/day; classes are $135 or $90/week

Summer at the Academy offers day camp and summer classes. Day camp is a child care program open to students entering grades PK3-5, and summer classes are week-long (three hours/day) fun and creative classes. Summer classes are open to grades PK4-10.

♦ Summer at the Academy Day Camp
Pulaski Academy, 12701 Hinson Road, Little Rock
(501) 604-1907 | Donna.Horton@PulaskiAcademy.org
Dates: June 1-July 17, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Ages: Rising grades PK3-5
Cost: $34/day

This experience provides a stimulating and safe environment with a weekly theme-based curriculum. Activities include reading, art, science, math, games and creative play.

♦ Camp Wonder
The Wonder Place, 10301 N. Rodney Parham, LR
(501) 225-4050
Dates: June 1-5, July 20-24, Aug. 10-14; 9 a.m.-noon
Ages: Grades Pre-K-2

Little ones can learn and play in the indoor playspace, and engage in arts & crafts, science and reading. Campers must be potty-trained.

♦ Zoofari Investigation
Little Rock Zoo, 1 Zoo Drive, LR
(501) 661-7229
Dates: Ages 5-7: June 15-17, June 29-July 1, July 13-15; Ages 8-10: June 22-24, July 6-8
Ages: Ages 5-7, Ages 8-10
Cost: $100, Zoo members and second child discount $85

Three-day sessions teach biology and conservation concepts through games, arts & crafts, and hands-on activities. This year’s theme has participants investigating and solving “crimes” committed in nature.

The Crucible Camp at The Innovation Hub
Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 201 East Broadway, North Little Rock
(501) 907-6570
Dates: June 9-Aug. 6; Tue.-Thu., 2-6 p.m.
Ages: Ages 14-16
Cost: $100 per week

A three-day intensive program is designed to introduce teenagers to real world dynamics and opportunities in making. Mentors and teachers guide all aspects of electricity, computers, additive and subtractive manufacturing and fabrication. The goal is to show how all of these platforms can lead to productive successful futures. On August 7, all Crucible students will be invited to share what they learned throughout the summer and show off their project in a showcase.

Summer Academy
River Valley Montessori, 1509 N. Pierce St., Little Rock
(501) 603-0620 | Admin@ARVMontessori.org
Dates: June 1-Aug. 7
Ages: Ages 3-9
Cost: $145/week

There will be a variety of in-depth fields of study that may include astronomy, gardening, cooking, music and more. The work period is relaxed yet structured, and includes both planned and self-directed activities. Learning doesn’t stop indoors; the children will enjoy educational, fun activities and lessons both inside and out.

Super Summer Saturdays at the Clinton Center
Clinton Presidential Center, 1200 President Clinton Ave., Little Rock
(501) 370-8000 | JWillis@ClintonFoundation.org
Dates: Saturdays beginning June 13-Aug. 8 (excluding July 4), 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Ages: All ages
Cost: Free

The Clinton Center invites children to enjoy Super Summer Saturdays. Each Saturday, the center will host free educational activities in conjunction with its summer 2015 temporary exhibit, “Dinosaurs Around the World.”

Young Maker’s Camp: All About Electricity at The Innovation Hub
Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 201 East Broadway, North Little Rock
(501) 907-6570
Dates: June 8-12, 8 a.m.-noon
Ages: Ages 8-10
Cost: $150

Each day campers will learn exciting aspects of electricity and their minds will be able to explore and create! This is an open-ended exploration of electricity, electronics and complex circuits. Learn the rules and the components required to repair, design and build electronics. After learning the basics, kids get hands-on with projects ranging from simple switches to radio controlled aircraft.

Camp Connect
Fellowship Bible Church, 1051 Hogan Lane, Conway
(501) 733-1627 | MaryGarlington.RDI@Gmail.com
Dates: June 15-19
Ages: 9-13
Cost: $125

This day camp is designed for children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder, including Asperger’s syndrome and PDD-NOS. The focus of Camp Connect is to provide an exciting camp experience with an emphasis on collaborating with peers, building relationships, and working together to think dynamically in the “real world.” Field trips into the community will provide a more well-rounded experience. Camp Connect participants must be able to function safely within a small group setting, without one-on-one assistance.

Maker’s Camp: All About Electricity at The Innovation Hub
Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 201 East Broadway, North Little Rock
(501) 907-6570
Dates: June 15-19, 8 a.m.-noon
Ages: Ages 11-13
Cost: $150

Each day campers will learn exciting aspects of electricity and their minds will be able to explore and create! This is an open-ended exploration of electricity, electronics and complex circuits. Learn the rules and the components required to repair, design and build electronics. After learning the basics, kids get hands-on with projects ranging from simple switches to radio controlled aircraft.

BearsWrite: From Pencils to Pixels
201 Donaghey Ave., Mashburn Hall 104, Conway
(501) 450-3128 | DWake@UCA.edu
Dates: June 22-26, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Rising grades 4-9
Cost: $150

Students of creative writing will use traditional and digital methods to study how to use voice, setting, word choice, character traits, point-of-view, journaling and poetry. Campers will create digital portfolios of their best work, a camp digital anthology, and will participate in a public performance of student work. Campers will be inspired through field trips on and off campus and through interactions with featured guests.

Camp Invention
Magness Creek Elementary School, 16150 Hwy. 5, Cabot
(800) 968-4332 | CampInvention@Invent.org
Dates: June 22-26, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ages: Rising grades 1-6
Cost: $220

Camp Invention is an adventure in creativity that immerses children in exciting, hands-on learning disguised as fun activities.

Young Maker’s Camp: Computer Tech at The Innovation Hub
Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 201 East Broadway, North Little Rock
(501) 907-6570
Dates: June 29-July 3, 8 a.m.-noon
Ages: Ages 8-10
Cost: $150

Everything in the 21st Century begins with computers– from coding and programming to exploring space, you can do it all from behind a computer terminal. Video games, computer-aided design, networking and video/music editing are powerful tools for discovering and exploring the world. Let your child dive into the world of computers and learn how everything is made!

Maker’s Camp: Computer Tech at The Innovation Hub
Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 201 East Broadway, North Little Rock
(501) 907-6570
Dates: July 6-10, 8 a.m.-noon
Ages: Ages 11-13
Cost: $150

Everything in the 21st Century begins with computers– from coding and programming to exploring space, you can do it all from behind a computer terminal. Video games, computer-aided design, networking and video/music editing are powerful tools for discovering and exploring the world. Let your child dive into the world of computers and learn how everything is made!

Smart Art at Camp Colorful at Mid-America Science Museum
Mid-America Science Museum, 500 Mid-America Blvd., Hot Springs
(501) 767-3461, ext. 113 | ShenaB@MidAmericaMuseum.org
Dates: July 6-10; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 9-12
Cost: $200, members $175

Kids learn about science in a safe, hands-on educational environment with trained educators. This week, they’ll explore the color spectrum and learn the amazing science behind various art projects.

Summer Laureate University for Youth (SLUFY)
2801 S. University Ave., SUA 101, Little Rock
(501) 569-3410 | GiftedCenter@UALR.edu
Dates: July 13-24, 12:30-5:30 p.m.
Ages: Grades K-8
Cost: $300; scholarships applications due May 19

SLUFY is celebrating 36 years of adventure! The program offers a variety of classes and presents an opportunity to learn through hands-on experiences, guest speakers and field trips under the guidance of enthusiastic teachers while meeting other gifted and talented students. This year SLUFY will be hosted by Booker Arts Magnet School in Little Rock.

The 3 E’s: Engineering, Electricity, and Energy at Mid-America Science Museum
Mid-America Science Museum, 500 Mid-America Blvd., Hot Springs
(501) 767-3461, ext. 113 | ShenaB@MidAmericaMuseum.org
Dates: July 13-17; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 9-12
Cost: $200, members $175

Kids learn about science in a safe, hands-on educational environment with trained educators. This week, young scientists experience mechanical, electrical, and solar madness through light machines, crazy bots, gizmos, and toy take-a-part activities.

Mystery at the Museum at Mid-America Science Museum
Mid-America Science Museum, 500 Mid-America Blvd., Hot Springs
(501) 767-3461, ext. 113 | ShenaB@MidAmericaMuseum.org
Dates: July 20-24; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 9-12
Cost: $200, members $175

Kids learn about science in a safe, hands-on educational environment with trained educators. This week, campers gather evidence, and analyze fingerprints, hair, blood, and fiber to help the Mid-America Science Forensics team solve the case of the missing skull.

Young Maker’s Camp: Fab Lab at The Innovation Hub
Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 201 East Broadway, North Little Rock
(501) 907-6570
Dates: July 20-24, 8 a.m.-noon
Ages: Ages 8-10
Cost: $150

Does your child like to MAKE and put crazy things together? In this camp, they can explore the land of 3D printing, computer controlled laser cutters, sewing machines, screws, glue and thread. Materials combine with one another to create the inventions that youngsters design.

Youth Chefs Culinary Summer Camp Level I
Pulaski Technical College Little Rock-South, Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institute, 1300 I-30, Little Rock
(501) 907-6670 ext. 3407 | ESMartin@PulaskiTech.edu
Dates: July 20-24, July 27-31; 8 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Ages: Entering grades 5-12
Cost: $250, includes all materials and supplies

Students spend five days honing their skills by rotating through stations in the kitchen, including starters, snacks and breakfasts, entrées, and desserts. Through these stations, they will learn knife skills; how to make soups, stocks and sauces; cooking methods; meat and seafood cookery; vegetable, fruit, bean and grain cookery; basic baking and pastry techniques; and the importance of cleaning and sanitizing. Chef coats and hats will be provided, along with a recipe packet that includes all menu items the students have prepared. Students will feast on the nutritious meals they prepare. On the last day of camp students will invite two guests to attend a three-course luncheon they will prepare using their new skills. Students who complete Level I are eligible to enroll in the Level II camp in August. Deadline to turn in application and fee is June 30.

Laboratory Lunacy at Mid-America Science Museum
Mid-America Science Museum, 500 Mid-America Blvd., Hot Springs
(501) 767-3461, ext. 113 | ShenaB@MidAmericaMuseum.org
Dates: July 27-31; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Ages: 9-12
Cost: $200, members $175

Kids learn about science in a safe, hands-on educational environment with trained educators. During this chemistry camp, kids analyze the chemicals in the creek, create bubbling chemical reactions, putrid potions, and dancing goo.

Maker’s Camp: Fab Lab at The Innovation Hub
Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 201 East Broadway, North Little Rock
(501) 907-6570
Dates: Aug. 3-7, 8 a.m.-noon
Ages: Ages 11-13
Cost: $150

Does your child like to MAKE and put crazy things together? In this camp, they can explore the land of 3D printing, computer controlled laser cutters, sewing machines, screws, glue and thread. Materials combine with one another to create the inventions that youngsters design.

WILDKids Cook! Summer Camp
Wildwood Park for the Arts, 20919 Denny Road, Little Rock
(501) 821-7275 | Sofia@WildwoodPark.org
Dates: August 3-7
Ages: 8 & up
Cost: $200, includes $50 non-refundable registration fee, recipe book and snacks.

Faith Anaya of Kids Cook! Arkansas leads hands-on training in the kitchen and teaches basic cooking and food preparation skills. Campers explore various cuisines from around the world including Mexican, African, Chinese and more. WILDKids Cook! includes a field trip to the Historic Arkansas Museum garden and will culminate in a camper-prepared lunch for friends and family.

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General

♦ Experience the Rock
First United Methodist Church, 723 Center St., Little Rock
(501) 372-2256 | DHankins@FUMCLR.org
Dates: June 15-18, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Ages: Grades 5-6
Cost: $20

Campers gain five perspectives of Little Rock in five days. This dynamic camp includes field trips and activities designed to help experience our city as a tourist, a person living on the margins, the disabled, a child and a millionaire. This is a fun way to learn about the community in which we live, grow and serve.

Huff ‘n Puff Summer Day Camp
613 N. First St. (Stonewall Square), Jacksonville
(501) 985-1818 | HuffnPuffGymandDance@Gmail.com
Dates: June 8-Aug. 14, 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Ages: 4-12
Cost: Prices vary for one, three, or five days a week; five days weekly $110

The Summer Day Camp is licensed by the state of Arkansas. Activities include daily gymnastics, indoor/outdoor play; dance, swimming pool weekly outings, games, arts and crafts. The camp is for girls and boys, and campers can attend five, three or one day a week.

Summer Fun Camps
Little Rock Racquet Club, 1 Huntington Road, Little Rock
(501) 225-5711 | NDillon@LRRCFC.com
Dates: June 1-Aug. 7
Ages: 5-12
Cost: $195 (members), $210 per week (non-members)

Camp groups are small and individually themed with activities and field trips. Field trips are three days a week, swimming everyday (two lessons weekly) and weekly trips to Wild River Country (Wednesdays). Snacks and crafts are included in the price.

Vacation Sensation 2015
Child Development Center, 324 W. 8th St., Little Rock
(501) 372-2327 | Arrena@ChildDevelopmentCenterLR.com; SchoolAge@ChildDevelopmentCenterLR.com
Dates: TBA
Ages: 4-12
Cost: $110/week; $150 registration fee for children attending six weeks or fewer; $200 registration fee for children attending for seven weeks or more.

Children will have a fun, rewarding and safe summer experience through diverse activities and field trips. Breakfast and snacks (peanut free) are provided.

Camp Solgohachia in the City
Morrilton City Park, Solgohachia
(501) 354-3959 | CKayWilcox@Hotmail.com
Dates: June 29-July 3, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Ages: Grades K-12
Cost: Free

Camp Solgohachia packs up everything – including go-karts – and heads to the Morrilton City Park for a free week of camp. Registration is required.

Camp Solgohachia Day Camp
Ozark Conference Center, 4 Ozark Mountain Road, Solgohachia
(501) 354-3959 | CKayWilcox@Hotmail.com
Dates: July 6-10, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Ages: Rising grades 3-8
Cost: $120 (includes lunch)

This Christian day camp offers worship along with an active week full of traditional camping activities.

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Outdoors

♦ Arkansas Outdoor School Summer Day Camp
1 Four-H Way, Little Rock
(501) 821-6884 | MSimmons@UAEX.edu
Dates: June 15-Aug. 7
Ages: 7-15
Cost: Prices range from $190-$346, depending on session options.

The Arkansas Outdoor School Summer Day Camp has carefully developed a variety of themed camps that provide your children the opportunity to have fun and learn throughout the summer months. Each camp runs one week at a time, Monday through Friday. All camp activities are designed to emphasize teamwork, self-confidence, communication and cooperation.

♦ Kanakuk Kamp Out!
Little Rock Christian Academy, 19010 Cantrell Road, Little Rock
(501) 868-9822 | Darrell.Smith@LittleRockChristian.com
Dates: June 1-5, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Ages: Rising grades 1-7
Cost: $225

Kanakuk partners with Little Rock Christian Academy to bring kids a fun-filled week of activities and worship. Campers can play field games, dodge ball, team sports and much more. The daily schedule includes skits and devotionals and a K-Life worship time. Snacks will be provided, but students must bring their own lunch.

Farm Summer Camps at Good Earth Learning Center
511 Ernie Davis Road, Austin
(501) 732-0321 | GoodEarthLearningCenter@Gmail.com
Dates: All summer, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Ages: 5-12
Cost: $175 per week

Campers engage in active outdoor experiences at this learning center, located on a family farm outside of Cabot. Kids feed chickens and gather eggs, take care of lambs and bunnies, pick fruits and vegetables from the garden, and go on nature walks.

Ferncliff Summer Day Camp
1720 Ferncliff Road, Little Rock
(501) 821-3063 | JGill@Ferncliff.org
Dates: June 8-12, 15-19, 22-26, June 29-July 3, 6-10, 13-17, 20-24, 27-31
Ages: Grades K-6
Cost: Varies

Day campers will enjoy a week full of activities in a natural setting. In addition to outdoor play, there is morning Bible study and afternoon worship. Camp is 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. Lunch and snacks are provided. Transportation is available.

Holtzman Riding Academy
4618 Highway 5. South, Benton
(501) 860-2378
Dates: June & July
Ages: 6-12
Cost: $200 (three days), $325 (five days)

Students practice horse riding with instruction, health, care, and ground work with their horses. Activities include obstacles, games on horseback, and so much more.

Lake Nixon Summer Day Camp
18500 Cooper Orbit Road, Little Rock
(501) 228-0202 | KWest@2BCLR.com
Dates: June 8-Aug. 7, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Ages: Grades K5-5
Cost: $130 per week; pay only for the weeks you register to attend; discounts are offered for siblings.

This camp, operated by Second Baptist Church-Downtown, lets children participate in Bible study, crafts, music, recreation, swimming, fishing, hiking, paddle boats and more. Bus transportation is available from Little Rock locations. Register by May 1.

Midland Farm Summer Camp
3406 Midland Road, Alexander
(501) 590-0784 | MPGods@SBCGlobal.net
Dates: June 8-12, 22-26; July 6-10, 20-24; Aug. 3-7, 10-12
Ages: 6 & up
Cost: $260 per session; discounts are available for siblings or friends attending the camp.

Power up this summer with horses! This camp includes lessons in riding and grooming, as well as games and free time. Every camper will also learn what it takes to care for a horse. Before- and after- care are available. Each camp has a capacity of 10 campers.

Junior Learn to Sail Camp-Beginners
12000 Maumelle Harbor Road, Little Rock
MarcellaMeyer@ATT.net
Dates: June 8-12
Ages: Ages 7 & up
Cost: $120/member, $160/non-member

The Grande Maumelle Sailing Club’s goal is to promote the sport of sailing in Central Arkansas, teach water and boating safety, and good sportsmanship. Campers will learn to rig/de-rig the 8-foot pram, determine wind direction, steering, points of sail, and basic boat handling.

Junior Learn to Sail Camp-Intermediate
12000 Maumelle Harbor Road, Little Rock
MarcellaMeyer@ATT.net
Dates: June 8-12
Ages: Ages 7 & up
Cost: $120/member, $160/non-member

The Grande Maumelle Sailing Club’s goal is to promote the sport of sailing in Central Arkansas, teach water and boating safety, and good sportsmanship. In the Intermediate camp, participants learn to build and sharpen beginning skills, sail trim, weight placement, right of way rules, and introduction to sailboat racing.

Settlers Day Camp
Plantation Agriculture Museum, 4815 AR Hwy. 161 South, Scott
(501) 961-1409 | PlantationAgriMuseum@Arkansas.com
Dates: June 17-19
Ages: 8-12
Cost: $30

This pioneer retreat will take your kids out for a blast into the past with a thrilling camp. Join a park interpreter in this fun-filled adventure to explore Arkansas’ wild uncharted territories of the first settlers to Arkansas’ fields of the last sharecroppers. Fun, hands-on activities include old timey games, outdoor cooking, corn grinding, pioneer crafts, and more. The fee covers snacks and supplies. Register by Wednesday, June 10.

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Vacation Bible School

♦ Hometown Nazareth: Where Jesus Was a Kid
First United Methodist Church, 723 Center St., Little Rock
(501) 372-2256 | DHankins@FUMCLR.org
Dates: June 22-26, 8:30-11:30 a.m.
Ages: Age 4-grade 4
Cost: $20

Hear stories about Jesus’ childhood from the best source of all: his mom, Mary! Kids go back to Hometown Nazareth, where they’ll stand up for their faith among people who doubt that the carpenter’s son is really God’s son. Bring a sack lunch every day if staying for music camp in the afternoon. Refrigeration will not be provided.

♦ Everest: Conquering Challenges with God’s Mighty Power
St. James United Methodist Church, 321 Pleasant Valley Drive, Little Rock
(501) 217-6700
Dates: July 20-23, 9 a.m.-noon
Cost: Free

This year’s VBS theme is all about conquering challenges, like a climb up Mount Everest!

Park Hill Baptist Vacation Bible School
Park Hill Baptist Church, 201 E. C Ave., North Little Rock
753-3413
Dates: July 6-10, 8:30 a.m.-noon
Ages: PreK4- grade 6 (completed)
Cost: Free

“Journey Off the Map” takes kids to uncharted territory where they will begin to understand that obedience to God can lead them beyond the expected. So, toss the map, stick close to your guide, and prepare to listen to God’s direction in this journey that is unknown to us, but known by Him.

G Force - God’s Love In Action
Pulaski Heights United Methodist Church, 4823 Woodlawn, Little Rock
(501) 664-3600 | CEnglade@PHUMC.com
Dates: July 12-16
Ages: 3 years old-grade 6
Cost: Free
Children can learn about “God’s Love in Action” during this vacation Bible school.

Photo Album: Little Rock Family Goes Fishing

Gallery by Mark Friedman

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The Central Arkansas Nature Center held its fishing derby at MacArthur Park in Little Rock Feb. 7. See who was there to cast a line!

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Family Finance: 5 Tips for Planning a Family Vacation

Note from the editor: This month, we’re proud to introduce Family Finances, a regularly appearing column presented by First Security Bank. Little Rock Family is dedicated to strengthening families in every aspect, and in our new editorial column we’ll explore ways that families can make healthy financial choices. To suggest a topic or ask a question for an upcoming Family Finances column, email Blair at BNeel@abpg.com.

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Every time my wife and I sit down to plan the annual family summer vacation, I can’t help but think of Clark Griswold firing up the family computer to break down a cross-country journey to Wally World in the 1983 classic “National Lampoon’s Vacation.” I can’t help you with a crazy cousin-in-law or an aunt and her untimely demise in the backseat, but I can offer you five tips on being fiscally sound in your trip planning.

1. Cash or Credit?

Paying for your trip with cash can help you stay within your budget and prevent overspending. It’s easier to see how much cash you have left than to figure up your credit card balance. You also won’t have to pay off your trip little by little, or pay any interest on your vacation purchases if you pay for your trip with cash.

On the other hand, the protection offered by using your credit card can be a benefit, too. For instance, if you buy refundable airline tickets with your credit cards, the airline must forward a credit to your card company within seven days of receiving your application for a refund. Then there’s the possibility to receive travel insurance when paying with your card, including baggage protection or travel accident insurance.

Bottom line, consider the benefits of both. It may make sense to mix and match your payment methods depending on what costs you’re covering.

2. Money Back Guarantee?

What happens if you are forced to cancel your trip for an unforeseen reason? Will you still have to pay? In most cases, you’ll be charged with a penalty. Before booking the trip, research your options and the cancellation process. It’s stressful enough to cancel your vacation; you don’t want the added frustration of paying for a trip you don’t get to go on!

3. Budgeting

If you have a propensity to overspend, try setting a daily budget for yourself. You can make this as simple or as in-depth as you’d like, from setting a spending cap for each day to breaking down how much you’d like to spend on each activity.

Instead of overspending, try over-budgeting. Plan for those surprise expenses before they surprise you. Add $25-$50 per person per day into your existing budget to build in the cost of that phone charger you forgot to pack or cab ride you didn’t expect.

You can also leverage technology as your aid in vacation budgeting—a variety of travel budget calculators can be found online. For tracking expenses while you travel, try a phone app, such as Trail Wallet for iPhone users; Toshl is a good bet for Android users.

4. Health Insurance

Before traveling, make sure you know what your insurance will cover while you’re away. If you have an HMO or PPO plan, service from an out-of-network provider will cost more. It’s a good idea to take a list of in-network physicians and hospitals for the area in which you are traveling.

And if traveling outside of the United States, your insurance may not cover you at all; call the claims department and ask. If you find you will not be covered, consider a short-term supplemental policy to cover accident or sickness coverage. Coverage and terms vary from policy to policy, so make sure you understand what’s covered and what’s not.

5. Protect Your Money

Ensure the safety of your money by avoiding carrying large sums of cash. Debit, credit and ATM cards are the safer way to go, at least until you arrive at your destination. If you’re using cash as your daily budgeting technique, you can withdraw smaller amounts as you go.

I can’t promise that you won’t drive off the road and into the Grand Canyon, or arrive at your destination only to find it closed for repairs like the Griswolds, but you might find yourself better prepared and more at ease by considering these five commonly overlooked vacation planning steps.

Dale Nicholson, III, AAMS is a Financial Advisor at Raymond James & Associates, Inc. Member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC, located in Little Rock. Dale is a former sports anchor turned financial advisor. He describes himself as a food addict, sports fanatic, golf hacker, fish catcher, husband to Cassie, and father to 6-year-old Natalie and 3-year-old LD.

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